US India Naval Exercise Habu Nag 2010

Habu Nag took place from 29 September to 4 October 2010 lasting a total of 6 days. Habu Nag is just one bilateral exercise conducted between the U.S. and India where the US Navy ships make routine visits to the country each year.

In 2009, when the exercise took place at the US Marines base in Okinawa, Japan, India opted not to participate. While no reason was given for the last minute pull-out, regional sensitivities were thought to be behind the move.

Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Edward P Oyola cleans an M-240B machine gun in the armory of the USS Essex

The Indian military has no marine corps. Instead they deploy a specially trained amphibious army division to perform beach landings.

Col Manoj Tiwari, of the Indian army said of his experience, “We have learned a lot about the US Marine Corps and how they function and work with the naval element. We have the experience on land; what we hope to learn is how the Marines perform landings and facilitate more fluid interaction between our own naval and amphibious elements.”

Major Roy Sinha of the Indian Army looks through ‘the big eyes’ on the bridge of the amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) in the East China Sea on Thursday, during a tour in conjunction with exercise Habu Nag

Members of the Indian armed forces tour the bridge of the amphibious assault ship USS Essex as part of exercise Habu Nag. Habu Nag is an annual bilateral amphibious training exercise between the U.S. and India designed to increase interoperability on amphibious operations including humanitarian assistance and disaster response.

Rear Adm. Richard Landolt, commander of Task Force 76, tours the INS Jalashwa, formerly the USS Trenton, with Indian navy Rear Adm. Satish Soni, commander of the Eastern Fleet, and Capt. B. S. Ahluwalia, commanding officer of the Jalashwa, during exercise Habu Nag in Visakhapatnam, India. Habu Nag is a command level tabletop exercise between the United States and India.

U.S. Navy Quartermaster 3rd Class Danielle Andrews-Johnson, right, shows a radar console to Maj. Sinha Roy of the Indian Army on the bridge of amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) during exercise Habu Nag Sept. 30, 2010, in the East China Sea. Habu Nag is an annual, bilateral amphibious training exercise between the United States and India designed to increase interoperability on amphibious operations

The Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Pecos (T-AO 197), center, refuels the amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2), left, and the amphibious transport dock ship USS Denver (LPD 9). Essex and Denver are part of the permanently forward-deployed Essex Amphibious Ready Group

OKINAWA, Japan (Oct. 5, 2010) – Indian Col. Manoj
Tiwari, 1st Lt. Christopher Suhre and Lt. Cmdr. Ronnie Mangsat return to
White Beach Naval Installation after an at-sea portion of Habu Nag, an
amphibious training exercise, with the Essex Amphibious Ready Group (Essex
ARG). USS Essex (LHD 2), USS Denver (LPD 9), USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49), USS Tortuga (LSD 46) and embarked Marines from the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit comprise the Essex ARG and will continue on a scheduled patrol throughout the Western Pacific. (U.S. Navy Photo by Lt. Colby Drake/Released)

OKINAWA, Japan (Oct. 5, 2010) – Sea Knight (CH-46) helicopters from Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron (HMM) 262, “The Flying Tigers,” arrive at White Beach Naval Installation with Indian navy and army representative at the end of Habu Nag, an amphibious training exercise between the United States and India. USS Essex (LHD 2), USS Denver (LPD 9),
USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49), USS Tortuga (LSD 46) and embarked Marines from
the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit comprise the Essex Amphibious Ready Group
and will continue on a scheduled patrol throughout the Western Pacific.
(U.S. Navy Photo by Lt. Colby Drake/Released)

OKINAWA, Japan (Oct. 1, 2010) – Commanding Officer of Indian Naval Ship Jalashwa, Capt. Alok Bhatnagar, and Indian Cdr. Ran Babu speak with a U.S. Consulate, Naha representative during an evacuation exercise with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) on White Beach Naval Installation. The 31st MEU are a part of the Essex Amphibious Ready Group and will continue on a scheduled patrol throughout the Western Pacific. (U.S. Navy Photo by Lt. Colby Drake/Released)

PACIFIC OCEAN (Oct. 1, 2010) – Cmdr. Thomas Bush, right, speaks to members of the Singaporean, Indian and Vietnamese armed forces during a distinguished visitors tour on the flag bridge of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s